The Throne – Isn’t it time entertainers, remembered The Audience ?

Today we look to Chuck D for Inspiration on Humility and Humanity

What you see above reflects our view on that so called Throne.  it’s exactly like we found it in google.  probably exactly like you’d find it in any economically depressed area.  To Us, it’s not clear from this chair if it’s urban, rural or where-ever. we just know that this is the throne most folks know about and it’s more realistic when you talk about today’s economic class-ism.

Chuck D wanted to inform the two: “Otis Redding was a humble country man from Macon, Georgia who bought a jet to work in, not flash.” In the song, Kanye West sings “Can’t you see the private jets flyin’ over you?/Maybach bumper sticker reading ‘What Would Hova Do?”

He spoke out recently on the Watch the Throne release. Chuck expressed exactly what we and many others felt. Check this out, and continue below

This clipping is from a piece in The Grio – which you can find here

..”While the commentary below the video he clearly states that it is not a diss but a “polite respect call to the troops.” He asks that they take time in their raps to “reflect the people better.” The people he refers to mainly belongs to the same disenfranchised communities who are competing daily for minimum-wage jobs, many teenagers of which 39.2 percent are unemployed, seeking a way to pay their concert tickets up to $300 and more.

Click here to view a Grio slideshow of the top 20 political hip-hop songs

Chuck D — who made hip-hop history with politically-charged songs like “Fight the Power” as activist-inspired role models for the youth — took to this new track to inspire this generation’s leading rappers about the importance of relation to their audience.

He points out the fact that the prison industrial complex is not “swagger,” “whips wheeling is a million miles from what people’s feeling (no gas)” and how the current unemployment rate is a reflection of the 16.2 percent of those suffering “depression inside a recession.”

While some have grown to prefer to hear about the lavish lifestyle of others than to be reminded about the trials and tribulations of their own, is it this same conditioning that has kept commercial hip-hop stagnant for so long? Where is the balance?

As commercial hip-hop sits in the ever-multiplying world of commerce, is it up to artists such as Jay-Z and Kanye West who have risen from rags to riches, to take the responsibility to set the standards for what the people need to hear? With their album, Watch the Throne described as having elements of “deep thought” touching on intimate subjects, then who and what is dictating what singles will sell?

dream hampton, musical, cultural and political journalist who co-wrote Jay-Z’s New York Times best seller Decoded, seems to agree. “I think it best to tuck away G4 talk this summer,” she concludes in “Commentary: Tuck Your Wealth”, an article she wrote about hip-hop braggadocio.

She brings Soulja Boy into discussion — an artist known for independently making millions through his own use of cyber-publicity — having lied about buying a $55,000,000 private jet for his 21st birthday.

While some had the right mind to question what the state of one’s worth would have to be to acquire such an expensive gift, others published it as truth and asked no further questions.

The ‘private jet,’ over time, has turned into the ultimate test of ‘who made it’ and who has not. Coincidentally, “Otis” was chosen as the title of Jay-Z and Kanye’s song not simply relating to Redding being sampled on the track, but due to the fatal crash that caused him his life in 1967 on his personal Beechcraft 18 airplane.

Chuck D wanted to inform the two: “Otis Redding was a humble country man from Macon, Georgia who bought a jet to work in, not flash.” In the song, Kanye West sings “Can’t you see the private jets flyin’ over you?/Maybach bumper sticker reading ‘What Would Hova Do?”

But when Hova’s reality no longer matches that of his audience, and majority of his audience are suffering the effects of a declining economy, perhaps the last thing he needs to do is provide us with details of his economic status. Or maybe it’s time to turn off the radio.  (end of clipping)

So as you can see, the real word is that the throne needs to watch those beneath it; in order not to become firewood for the cold and needy. Everyone is hungry in this economy, but releasing a cd praising the opulence of richness is a dangerous thing for an artist today.  About as bad as keeping a wrecked Maybach in ya backyard or lying about buying a fifty million dollar private plane for your birthday.

Many artists these days push their maximum swag approach as though it’s the answer to everyone’s emotional woes. But what we don’t see is their obvious disconnection from their origins, and the present life of most of their fans. There are very few chopped down Maybachs in the ghetto; and flashing three bright faces in the backseat is just more salt in the wound. there could be so much more, that we just don’t understand this; from three so called music legends.

Why do they think that those of us who are barely able to put food on our table are interested in hearing about world ventures, stackin stacks; and new luxurious planes and whips. Sorry not this time hov.

The poor choice to use a classic Otis Redding Tune the way they did makes it sting even more so for those of us who really respect music, and remember when the plane crash occurred.  I personally remember it, and have seen the artifacts of the crash at the RRHOF in Cleveland.  It’s nothing to joke about.

The ‘private jet,’ over time, has turned into the ultimate test of ‘who made it’ and who has not. Coincidentally, “Otis” was chosen as the title of Jay-Z and Kanye’s song not simply relating to Redding being sampled on the track, but due to the fatal crash that caused him his life in 1967 on his personal Beechcraft 18 airplane.

This is just plain flaunting your ignorance of History; as well as your distaste for the classics, and music lovers in general.

Honestly, There is so much that we don’t get from this release that we’re hoping it will unravel from this state of ultimate flux before the fall sets in. Somehow we doubt it.

Many reviews say this is the genius crew setting a new bar by opening gold on there first day. We think it’s just overselling by hype, which will end up resulting in gripes and revelations.  Mostly of how they are no longer like their audience enough to be able to relate to them; really.

The music business these days is filled with people who have little consciousness and even less interest in the masses. This is why the economics of music have shifted to singular efforts that either immediately become gold from association; or are tough enough to ride the resilience wave out until Grammy time.  either way the three names are brand labeling that even Maybach would surely give a vehicle to be chopped up and auctioned off. sure it’s for charity – but really now.. who is the beneficiary at the end of the day of the dramatic role play, and desensitized lyrics ?  Who Else – The Fans.

We’re sure that by the end of the year, Yeezie and King Bey will be back on the charts with new singles; and Jay will be somewhere buying something only he can afford.

Isn’t it time the entertainers, remembered The Audience ?